To those who say it’s ‘just natural red tide’

It’s more than just “red tide,” a naturally-occurring microscopic alga that has been documented along Florida’s Gulf Coast since the 1840’s. Floridians are upset about the overall treatment of our environment.

Mainstream media tends to downplay the effect of dumping phosphorus-laden pollutants into our ecological water system. Water moves freely along the peninsula, carrying all its sickness and impurities, so what we do in one place affects another.

Here’s a video taken in a North Fort Myers canal, August 9, 2018 at 6:05 pm:

From the video’s post:

I took a stick, and flipped over one of these floating blobs… what lies within looks like it is straight out of a septic tank, and smells like it too. Maybe worse. Like an outhouse in the sun.

There are hundreds and hundreds of these blobs. And that’s just MY canal

Completely grossed out even more now. Nothing can live in this.

Politicians helped slash environmental regulations while getting an applause from conned Floridians who were happy with “less government.” Those eliminations only helped huge corporations while hurting Floridians. The same rich, greedy Transplants that Florida Natives despise reaped all the benefits of the cultural warfare against environmentalists.

Real Floridians care about their water, their lakes, their springs, their beaches… we care, and that’s a great thing. Don’t be ashamed to love Florida and the planet we live on. Let’s work together, educate ourselves, and start fixing things.

Many politicians, Democrats and Republicans, are to blame for the current water and climate crisis, but blaming people doesn’t help. We’ve already caught and exposed them (which is important too), but nothing changes as a result of that. They just don’t care. “So what, you caught us,” is the attitude they exude with impunity. Just vote them out and try a new round of fresh possibilities.

Work with local government in your county and city to make agreements to preserve Florida forever. The EPA isn’t going to save us, but they can certainly help fund our projects and actualize our goals if we start voting in the right people. Until then, make every effort you can to inform others of the reality of our situation. Do what you can to treat our planet with respect.

As we learn new things, we should be eager to admit it. As we see others learning, we should not judge them for the lies they once believed. While it’s easy to ridicule the victims of propaganda, we promise to be nice. Sorry if we insulted you before. We just get upset when our magical little peninsula is under attack. One Florida. One Love, everybody.

Show your support at this event:

Clean Energy Fest 2017 – Pensacola, FL

bribe-clean-energy-free-beer-pensacola
A sign advertising Clean Energy Fest alongside a “Free Beer” sign in Pensacola. (2017, submitted photo)

Clean Energy Fest Focuses on Our Energy Future

PENSACOLA — Pensacola’s second annual Clean Energy Fest brings renewable energy and fun to downtown Pensacola on Saturday, Nov. 5, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. The event celebrates a clean energy future through art, food, live music, and dynamic people showcasing solar, wind, and people-power for the 21st century. The event is part of the 2016 Pensacola Foo Foo Festival, and will be held at the Bowden Building and TT Wentworth Museum yard.
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Trump signs executive order that could allow Oil Drilling on Florida coast

Despite Florida’s ridiculousness, we must admit that it’s natural beauty is a wonder to behold. President Trump has just signed an executive order that threatens this natural beauty. This order warrants oil drilling in areas that include the South Atlantic Ocean area, which extends south to near Cape Canaveral. You can see the executive order here:

https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/04/28/presidential-executive-order-implementing-america-first-offshore-energy

We must not forget the devastation caused in April 20, 2010 when the Deepwater Horizon oil spill discharged 4.9 million barrels of oil into our precious ocean. Infant dolphins were dying six times faster than they did before the spill (Source).

“This is paradise,” said Senator Bill Nelson. “We don’t want to mess it up. We want to keep Florida as this place that is so beautiful so that our families and our guests can continue to enjoy.”

Bill Nelson has filed a bill to block expansion of offshore drilling, which you can learn more about on his website: billnelson.senate.gov

Our coral reef system would be in great danger if this order goes through, which has a domino effect of consequences. Once oil comes into contact with corals, it can kill them or impede their reproduction, growth, behavior, and development. The entire reef ecosystem can suffer from an oil spill, affecting the many species of fish, crabs, and other marine invertebrates that live in and around coral reefs.

Tourism would be affected as well… this should get the attention of those less concerned with life and more concerned with money.

“We have long been wise enough to know that we do not allow oil and gas rigs near our beaches in the state of Florida,” said Democratic Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman-Schultz. “They are just too sensitive and too vital to our fishing and tourism economy and our unique way of life.”

This is a non-political issue. This is about making the world we live in a safer place, and preserving the only planet we’ve found so far that can support human life. Let’s try not to destroy it.

“As a delegation, we have always drawn a line in the sand when it comes to drill off of Florida’s coast line and that’s why we’re here again today,” said Wasserman-Schultz. “We’re drawing a deeper bipartisan line in the sand that says “keep your drill baby drill policies away from our vital sensitive Florida coast.”

 

FPL Wins Battle to Store Radioactive Waste Under Miami’s Drinking Water Aquifer

radioactive waste

Update: Environmental activists have started a petition urging Florida lawmakers to prevent FPL from storing waste underground

South Florida sits atop two gigantic underground stores of water: the Biscayne and Floridan Aquifers. Miamians get most of their drinking water from the upper Biscayne Aquifer, while the government has used the lower portion of the Floridian to dump waste and untreated sewage — despite the fact that multiple studies have warned that waste could one day seep into the drinking water. Full Story »